marlin

Do You Need Help Rigging Your Marlin Lures?

A common question we get here at Fish Habitat Tool  is about how to properly rig a spread for marlin.  People often ask which is better, double hooks or a single hook?

Should you use a stiff connect leader or just let the hooks swing?  And, is it better to rig hookless and use the lure as a teaser to throw a pitch bait?

Well, these are all good questions and one’s that we often get from newer less experienced fishermen.

Keep in mind that there are many ways to configure your spread and we are just giving our opinion on what works best for us.  Remember that the waters you are trolling in, as well as the weather conditions will have a significant impact on how you approach which tackle to use.

In general, we like to rig both our double and our single hooksets with stiff rigs.  This allows for a more controlled, or less erratic motion to the lures as the are pulled through the water.

It is also good to try a wide range.  You might want to test rigging a single hook and have the eye immediately on the inside of the end skirt.

It’s important to use a stiff leader with your plug.  The reason is, when you’re fishing for marlin, let’s face it, we’re all hoping to hook up a big one, a fish to tell stories about for the rest of your life.  That is why you want to go with a 600 lb. extra hard leader.

This heavy of a leader might not swim as well as lighter leader, but the extra heaviness will be beneficial if you do hook a big one.  You don’t land a grander on a light leader.

If you liked this “how to” article, then you’ll probably also enjoy reading our article: Saltwater Fishing Tackle Essentials for the Intelligent Angler.

We hope this helps, and let us know if you have any other questions.  We love to help our readers learn more about the sport of big game saltwater fishing.

For more in-depth explanation on rigging lures, check out this excellent video from Peter Pakula.

 

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About Our Sportfishing Tackle

This tool was created with funding from the United States Fish and Sportfishing Guide Expeditions to provide resource managers and the general public with access to the extensive spatial data and results produced from multiple fish habitat assessments.

Additional assessments performed under funding and guidance from the North Atlantic Oceanic Conservation Group of Folks and the Atlantic Coastal Fish Habitat Program for Work are also included within the same web mapping application.

Three main analytical tools (visualization, ranking, and futuring) are combined with intuitive basemaps and mapping features to allow users to explore the details of the assessments and perform subsequent analyses

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